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CAUTION: Violence in Mexico continues

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 This article was in the Southern Pulse newsletter. Roberto

MEXICO

With 52 murders, 11 June 2010 was one of the deadliest days in Mexico within the past six years. 20 people were murdered outside of a rehabilitation center in Ciudad Juarez, another 20 killed in Ciudad Madero and 12 others murdered throughout the states of Durango, Guerrero, San Luis Potosi, and Sinaloa. The most violent day recorded in Mexico was 16 December 2009 with 64 murders.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 June 2010 17:18
 

Rosarito, Mexico

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Real Estate for Sale - Retirement

Rosarito, Mexico

7/28/2009

 Often referred to as "San Diego South," and just 20 miles south of the U.S. border, Rosarito, Mexico (population 140,000) has exploded in popularity the last few years and has a substantial expatriate retiree population. In fact, some estimates claim that nearly 25% of the residents in Rosarito are U.S. citizens, originally drawn by the sandy beaches, slower pace and reasonably priced homes. Once a quiet haven for Hollywood's early stars (Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy were frequent visitors), today this sunny metropolis stretches along nearly 40 miles of coastline and boasts mega-resorts, golf courses, shiny condo developments and high-end spas.

 
Unfortunately, much of the charm that brought Hollywood's elite to Rosarito in the 1940s and 1950s, and U.S. expats to Rosarito in this century, has been lost. Until recently, the rapid growth and mass influx of new residents had essentially turned Rosarito into an extension of Southern California, and urban sprawl, overcrowding, traffic congestion and rising real estate prices reminded many U.S. residents of the problems that they thought they had left back home.
 
While many of these problems still exist, they look quaint when compared with Rosarito's increasing drug war violence. An underlying sense of danger permeates the city now, and both tourists and expats are fleeing (although we also found expat retirees who say they feel perfectly safe in Rosarito). The busy main drag, Benito Juarez Boulevard, has been the scene of shootings, and killings have taken place throughout the city. Although local authorities stress that the murders involve drug dealers killing other drug dealers (and police), one never knows when that could change and foreigners could become targets.
 
In time, the drug wars may end, and Rosarito will once again be a safe expatriate playground. In the meantime, anyone thinking of retiring in Mexico should look at other destinations (Lake Chapala, San Miguel, etc.). Once an idyllic seaside village, Rosarito today seems to be a Paradise lost.
 
Once a low-cost oasis, a place where expat retirees could find affordable beachside real estate, a sunny climate and a laid-back lifestyle, Rosarito today is a place to avoid thanks to ever-increasing drug war violence.
 
 
 

Great Retirement Spots Newsletter is published eight times a month by Webwerxx, Inc., 2770 S. Elmira St., Denver, CO 80231. (303) 358-0512. Copyright © 2006-2009. All rights reserved. Issues previous to June, 2006 were published twice a month. No part of this electronic publication may be reproduced without the express written consent of Webwerxx, Inc. Many attempts were made to verify the accuracy of the information contained in this bulletin, but some information may have changed since publication. Webwerxx, Inc. cannot be held responsible for information that has changed since this publication appeared online. Please contact us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it if you have questions or comments.
 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:46
 

Oaxaca, Mexico - First Impressions

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Casa Victoria An Oasis, in Oaxaca

She was blond, so I asked her her name. Shannon she said, and asked where I was from. The blaring of a truck horn interrupted our polite conversation in the intersection of downtown Oaxaca. Yolanda leaned over and asked her if she knew where a dog friendly hotel might be. She did, and gave us directions. It turns out this was the very hotel Yolanda had found on the Internet but deleted the information when I was unable to confirm exactly what day we would arrive.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:46 Register to read more...
 

Mexico - First Impressions

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Our third country and our second international border. 2,954 miles (4,755 km) driven so far. We crossed the Mexican border at 10:15 a.m. The border crossing inspection at Laredo, TX was laughable. There was a “nothing to declare” lane with two large speed bumps. No-one so much as glanced at our passports or paperwork for the dogs. We drove right through and neither of us were sure whether we were in Mexico or not.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:47 Register to read more...
 

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico - First Impressions

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A Thriving Retirement Destination

 

San Miguel de Allende is a favorite city for thousands of expats - estimated to be 5,000 full time, 12,500 - 15,000 part-time (snowbirds), mostly from the USA although a very helpful real estate management gentleman Jim Dixon ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) said there were plenty of Canadians living in the area.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:46 Register to read more...
 

Zacatecas, Mexico - First Impressions

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Beware of Speed Traps and Gas Bandits

The five and a half hour drive could have been much longer if we were not driving on a Sunday, as the entire route (Hwy 20 - Hwy 54) is under construction. When they are working, the speed limit drops to 40 km/hr. We averaged 100 km/hr, but with sudden changes to 60 and 40 km along the way complete with waiting police cars. We saw someone from further away than we were - Alaska - pulled over by a speed trap.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:47 Register to read more...
 

Cuidad del Carmen, Mexico - First Impressions

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Mexico Changes Waterfront Ownership Laws

As I write this, I am actually in Rio Dulce, Guatemala. We have hit the five country mark - over 9,000 kilometers (over 5,000 miles) and boy does my butt need a rest! We plan to visit Captain Kathie Rogers on her boat My Joh. In Spanish the “j” is pronounced “heh” so her boat name becomes “My Ho”. This, coupled with our 'autopista hooker hotel' story is starting to put a seedy twist to this trip!

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:46 Register to read more...
 

Veracruz, Mexico - First Impressions

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mountainMisty Mountain Moonshine - Driving From Oaxaca to Veracruz

 

The “good road” from Oaxaca through the mountains over to Veracruz was spectacular. Thank God they were in excellent condition. Hairpin turns a few thousand feet in the air will wake you up - as the old joke goes; “When I die, I want to go like my grandfather - peacefully in his sleep, not screaming in terror like his passengers”.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:47 Register to read more...
 

Merida, Mexico - First Impressions

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Merida is a Great City!

 

The moment we drove through Merida, we knew we were going to like it. Smiling faces, clean streets, historic buildings, and a dynamic central square that was hopping with activity. We circled the main square looking for a hotel. We discovered an old classic Spanish hotel El Oviedo (www.hteloviedo.com.mx - Calle 62 y 67, Colonial Center) which was tired, but perfect. The best part of the hotel was that dogs were permitted in the rooms! The entrance is a little difficult to find, as it is just a stone arch off the street. There is a white sign flat against one of the sides of the entrance. You drive right into the lobby, past the courtyard and fountain, and into the rear secure parking area. The fifteen foot high, thick wooden doors at the top of the wide stone steps were very inviting. Iron railings on each balcony added to the Spanish colonial flavor.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:47 Register to read more...
 

Xcalat, Mexico - First Impressions

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More of a Cruising, Diving & Fishing Destination

Xcalat, Mexico (which means “little inlet” in Mayan). In Mexico, “x” is pronounced “ish” - so it is “ishcalat”. Xcalat is a small fishing village on the Caribbean coast. Long favored as a stopover for cruising sailors, this “sleepy little drinking village with a fishing problem” is more of a diving and fishing destination more than a retirement destination.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 17:47 Register to read more...
 


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